Alice at 150

I’ve mentioned a few times that AIW is 150 years old this year, which has led to projects like this and exhibits like this.  Because Harvard owns a lot of Lewis Carroll materials, The Boston Globe has been printing articles about the books and author.  Claire’s mom has been sending her clippings that Claire shared with me.  I couldn’t access some of them online for everyone to see, but I did get this one about the incredible number of translations of the Alice books: article on alice translations. I was actually lucky enough to see the Harvard exhibit in person this summer, so I’m also including here a few of my own (not very good) photos:

LC's original illustrations

LC’s original illustrations and text

The binding chosen by LC

The binding chosen by LC

First American edition of AIW

First American edition of AIW

Alice as a Guinness beer ad

Alice as a Guinness beer ad

LC alice game Harvard 2015

1932 theater production

1932 theater production

a German lampoon

a German lampoon

AIW in shorthand

AIW in shorthand

LC alice ill variants 2 Harvard 2015

LC alice nabokov trans Harvard 2015

Seaside edition?

Seaside edition?

LC for Japan Harvard 2015LC in Japanese Harvard 2015

LSD tabs

LSD tabs. Woah.

 

 

Alice and wonderland trivia

– Ever wonder why the march hare is mad and where he got his name from?
The march hare’s origin is from the popular British belief that during mating season, which is early February to September, hares act very strange or in others words they look crazy. Examples would be running around spastically or kicking other hares from their mates very aggressively. This is also the origin for the saying, “mad as a march hair.” So if anyone says that’s to you they are practically saying, “Gosh, you crazy rabbit in heat!” >_<)

-Why does the Cheshire disappear, and turn see through in the movies?
Well in the novel it is true that the Cheshire at one point does 'disappear' leaving just his grin, and freaking poor Alice out. But the true origin for this is actually from the artist the drew the original portrait of the Cheshire cat. When he was drawing Cheshire he decided to base the cat off of a famous painting by an artist names Thomas Gainsborough which is called "the Artist's Daughters."

do you see the cat?

Do you see the cat in the painting?
Leave a comment if you thought these were at all interesting ahah >_<